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Achlochan Coastal Heritage Project Update

  The Achlochan Peninsula in Achiltibuie has seen lots of activity over the past two months, with more to come. In late October a week long archaeological survey took place. The main focus was the ruined broch on the south-east of the peninsula, but the entire peninsula was considered and surveyed with many interesting new sites identified – the full report will be available by the end of this year. The survey work provided an opportunity for local residents to get involved and learn first-hand how professional archaeologists record and assess a site, whilst also hosting visits from 30 Achiltibuie and Lochinver Primary School pupils and 32 Ullapool High School pupils during the week. Work is now almost complete on a new track from the Piping School Café to the shore (for restricted vehicle access) and then on to the Firing Range Target (footpath only). This was undertaken by Scottish Water, and although part of the initial CALL project proposal, has been completed free of charge, providing much improved access to the peninsula and linking in with repair works to

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New polytunnel will help native seedlings to flourish

Funding has been received from the Highland Council through the Landfill Communities Fund towards a mesh polytunnel and materials for the propogation of native tries grown from local seed. Little Assynt Tree Nursery, has been working with the local community since 2012 to collect seeds and cuttings from the few remaining native trees scattered across the area.  The nursery is growing this scarce local seed into young trees and shrubs to be used in native woodland re-planting schemes both within the CALL area and elsewhere in the North West Highlands. Species under cultivation include oak, birch, rowan, hazel and scots pine.  Currently the nursery produces around 32,000 trees per year, but aspires to increase this output to around 100,000 over the next few years.  The native tree nursery was awarded Highly Commended in Scotland’s Finest Woods Awards 2013. The polytunnel will allow the slower growing seedlings to be grown under protection through their first summer and winter and increase growing capacity by 15,000 seedlings.

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 NEW CHAPTER FOR COIGACH AND ASSYNT LIVING LANDSCAPE PARTNERSHIP

 27th July 2016 Coigach and Assynt Living Landscape Partnership has secured funding worth £2.9 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund, with additional support from other funders, to enable delivery of a wide range of projects over the next five years. This support will enable Project Partners to deliver twenty eight projects that will collectively enhance the area’s natural, built and cultural heritage. Highlights include: creating and expanding native woodland, offering outdoor learning to all local schools, major repairs to the approach and summit paths of Suilven, and work to excavate and stabilise the Iron Age Clachtoll Broch. Jonathan Hughes, Chief Executive, Scottish Wildlife Trust said: “With these generous awards from HLF, the Lund Fund and many others, we now have the opportunity to achieve something very special for the landscapes, the wildlife and the communities of Coigach and Assynt. Through seeking to work in true partnership with local communities, neighbouring landowners and fellow conservation charities, the Scottish Wildlife Trust has already achieved so much more than it ever could by going it alone. Having been personally involved in this project from

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