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Thanks to You for 25 Years

The 19th November 2019 saw the 25th Birthday of the National Lottery and its funding of community projects such as us. The quiz this year was slightly different to the last. Instead of a December Christmas theme we had a Birthday party! Plenty of snacks and, of course, birthday cake, where shared amongst the 31 attendees as well as laughs and frustrations! Questions were based on the wildlife, landscape and people of CALL with added knowledge needed of 1994 to win this quiz. The scores were tight all night and the winners won by a quarter of a point! Congratulations to the winning team, The Indecicives and to the randomly picked team, The Developmentalists, we hope you enjoy your prizes. The baskets had a mix of local produce including the limited-edition Isle Martin Gin from the Highland Liquor Company in partnership with the Isle Martin Trust. CALLP has received £1.4 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund to the end of September 2019, with a further £1.5 million due over the next 2 years. This funding has, so far, helped us

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Have your say on the Clachtoll Broch viewing platform

Historic Assynt have submitted their planning application for the viewing platform at Clachtoll Broch to the Highland Council. Take a look at the plans and submit any comments to the council at the link below. The viewing platform is part of the Clachtoll Broch project, which is funded with thanks to players of the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund, Historic Environment Scotland, SSE Sustainable Development Fund, the Pilgrim Trust, the Robert Kiln Charitable Trust, and The Highland Council through the Scottish Landfill Communities Fund. More information about the Clachtoll Broch Project can be found at http://clachtoll.aocarchaeology.com/ View planning application (you will be redirected to Highland Council Planning Portal)

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Community Grants Scheme now open!

The third year of our Community Grants Scheme is now open for applications! The Coigach & Assynt Living Landscape Community Grants Scheme could offer you or your organisation financial assistance to conserve and enhance the natural, cultural or built heritage of the Coigach and Assynt regions. Grants available up to £1,000 for individuals or £5,000 for organisations. The Community Grants Scheme encourages and supports projects where: Heritage is better managed, in better condition, and/or identified / recorded People have developed skills, learnt about heritage, and/or volunteered time Communities have reduced environmental impacts, more engagement with heritage, and/or the area will be a better place to work, live and visit. Full grant criteria and terms and conditions can be found on the application form. See the Community Grants Scheme project page for details and to download the application form. Deadline for submissions is 12 noon on Monday 4th March! The Community Grants Scheme is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund and Scottish Natural Heritage.

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Happy Heritage Treasures Day!

Today is #HeritageTreasures day so we’re sharing some of the heritage treasures being conserved and enhanced through our partnership scheme, made possible thanks to players of the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund. Lets start big with the iconic mountain Suilven, where the path has been mightily improved by John Muir Trust over the last two years under the Suilven Path project. Suilven also holds a Heritage Treasure of its own: the mysterious wall that runs across its ridge, shown here while a helicopter delivers bags of stone for the higher up path repairs. No one quite knows why it’s there. Old boundary? Destitution relief work? Who knows. One of the reasons for repairing the Suilven path is to protect the Heritage Treasures at risk from walkers’ footfall such internationally significant bryophytes (mosses and liverworts), peat beds (important for carbon storage), and plantlife like this orchid next to the new path. If the 19km trek up Suilven and back is a bit much, the Assynt Foundation is also home to the Glencanisp Nature Trail. Built in 2017 the trail is a

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Lochinver: the Plaice to be this April!

Coigach & Assynt Living Landscape Partnership are delighted to announce this year we will be holding a ‘Food of the Sea Festival’ on Sunday the 14th April 2019 at Culag Park, Lochinver. It will be a one-day event showcasing local producers, suppliers and businesses from the Coigach and Assynt area to celebrate the fin-tastic seafood we have available here. Alongside produce stalls we hope to have some live cooking sessions where you can try some different ways of preparing and using local ingredients. Live music and family activities will also be scheduled over the day. If you would be interested in having a stall, showing us your cooking skills or supplying the event please get in touch! We would love to have as many local businesses and charities as possible join us for the celebration. Keep your eyes peeled for the logo reveal and more information of the event! Contact: Vickii Campen email: vcampen@coigach-assynt.org Office: 01571 844638

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Warmer, warmer, colder… GPS training for habitat condition monitoring

On a soggy and breezy Thursday and Friday in December we ran GPS training workshops for people involved with deer management who need to undertake habitat condition monitoring as part of the area’s deer management plans. Data will be gathered over a number of years, on two habitat types: blanket bog and dwarf shrub heath, to assess the impact deer browsing is having. This data can then be used in conjunction with count data and other factors to help set population targets for the areas. All this has the ultimate aim of creating a healthy habitat that supports all species living within it. GPS trackers are used for setting up the monitoring plots and to find the same plot in following years to measure the change in condition. GPS is used to give a grid reference for mapping where the monitor plots are and this grid reference is what guides the person doing the monitoring back to the same spot. A marker stake is left in the ground at the site of the monitor plot but as the stake shouldn’t

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Thanks To You Thankyou!

We were delighted to join the #ThanksToYou campaign this year and hold a Coigach and Assynt themed free quiz night for National Lottery players. Our event was one of hundreds across the country included in the campaign to say Thank you to people who have raised money for great causes by buying a lottery ticket. CALLP has received £882,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund to date, with a further £2million due over the next 3 years of the partnership. This funding has, so far, helped us with projects such as repairing the Suilven mountain path, excavating Clachtoll Broch, planting over 100ha of native woodland, establishing an outdoor education program for local schools, creating Glencanisp Nature Trail, auditing our Atlantic Hazel Woodlands, researching the soil fertility of the area, holding a series of woodland artisan workshops and a Community Grant Scheme giving grants towards promoting and conserving the area’s heritage. All this and still more projects to be started in 2019! So, to all of you who came to the quiz night and those who buy lottery tickets we would like

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Ullapool High School Students Survive The Iron Age!

Ullapool High School S2s stepped back in time on a windy, autumnal day at Clachtoll Broch earlier this month. Three main tasks had been prepared for the pupils, enabling them to delve further into their exploration of the local history as they work towards their Archaeology Scotland Heritage Hero Awards. The tepee was set up as a “Mock Broch” for an iron-age re-enactment activity, creating a feast to celebrate the life of their deceased clan chieftain. Various representations of food items were hidden around the area, and in small “family” groups, the S2s selected the required tools to assist them in obtaining the ingredients for their recipes. Delicacies ranged from roast venison with wild mushrooms and rowan jelly through to sea urchin with bread fingers. At the actual Broch, many different daily life chores and activities were set up for the S2s to get stuck into, from de-husking the wheat in the original knocking stone and milking a goat, to making clay pots and spinning wool using spindle whorls. As everyone got stuck into their task, there was a shout

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Baskets, Baskets, Baskets!

The latest Woodland Artisan Course was a 2 day willow weaving course with the wonderful Willow Weaving Expert Tim Palmer. Tim had previously taught a course for us and we just had to have him back for another! We had a nice mix in the group of beginners and those that had been on Tim’s courses before. The newcomers to weaving were aiming for a simple woven basket, where as the others were tasked with a challenge of a larger with more difficult techniques. Stages for basket weaving: Weave a round base with thin ‘weavers’ around thicker supporting willow (known as slath). Then add in the stakes around to form the structure for the sides when turned upwards. A weave called Waling is then used to strengthen the base and make the whole basket more rigid. The sides can be woven in several different ways such as Randing, Slewing, Pairing, Reverse Pairing, Fitching, Herringbone and Zig-zag. Once the basket is near the desired height another band of waling is completed before the slath are used to create the border for

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Creating a Highland Cup

The latest course from our Woodland Artisan project was cup carving. Wooden Tom was back to hold another great course, this time using axes, chisels Gouges and knives to carve a Highland cup based on one found in Ardgour on the West Coast created nearly 2000 years ago. We started with a Silver Birch log that requires cutting and splitting to ‘cup size’ and then carving into a finished product. One cup on the day was made from Pine, creating a beautifully stripy cup. Each course attendee got a quarter or half of the original log and, using a guide, the cup shape was marked onto the wood and excess was removed with an axe. Once a rough outline was created the bowl could start being carved – outside first and then the inside using gauges. The lip and handle of the cups were carved last with gauges and knives. Participants each took their cup home which then can be carved with a knife once the green wood has dried. Unfortunately, the winter evenings drew in too quick for us

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