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The Soil Beneath Our Feet

Guest blog by Joseph Peach, local musician and Project Manager for the Music & Tales project A living landscape is more than just scenery; it is the interaction between people and place. Stories, music and song reflect these interactions, helping us better understand where we have come from and where we might go. Coigach and Assynt have a wonderfully rich cultural heritage: A gàidhlig speaking area until recently, there were strong traditions of music and song, and a rich oral history. Indeed it produces more than it’s fair share of musicians who are reaching national and international acclaim. The ever-changing modern world poses a threat to oral traditions on a global scale. Simply, the practice of sharing information in this way no longer happens in a way that it once did. The project aims to capture, some of the area’s music, song and tales, while they still live amongst an ageing generation. To celebrate and promote them, and preserve them for future generations. It will create employment opportunities for musicians from the area, professional development and mentorship opportunities for our

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What’s different about Suilven?

Guest blog by Mandy Haggith, a director of the Assynt Foundation. Suilven is often described as an ‘iconic’ mountain, and it is certainly distinctive, with its long side-profile and sugar-loaf mounded summit. From different angles it looks like an elephant, or a camel, or a whale.  From the sea it is an unmistakable marker post for finding your way into the safe harbour of Lochinver, and its name may result from this, translating from the Gaelic as ‘Eye Mountain’ (suil is eye, ven a corruption of bhein, from ben)  suggesting that it’s the mountain to navigate by. But Suilven is not just an intriguing-looking hill, it is politically iconic as well. What’s different about Suilven is that it is one of just a few of Scotland’s mountains that belong to the local people. In 2005, Assynt Foundation bought it, along with Canisp, Cul Mòr and Cul Beag, as part of a community-buyout of two large (44,000 acre) hunting estates and the ‘big house’, Glencanisp Lodge. This was the first substantial purchase under the terms of the Land Reform (Scotland) Act, which

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National Tree Week at Little Assynt Tree Nursery

Last week we celebrated National Tree Week at Little Assynt Tree Nursery with the reopening of our Gaelic Alphabet Tree Trail. Pupils from Lochinver Primary School prepared tags with the Gaelic names for each of the trees and the letter they represent in the Gaelic Alphabet. Pupils then took us on a tour of the trail. Well done to all involved! Visitors are always welcome, so come along and have a wander along our new trail!

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